Posts Tagged ‘Project: LAYLA’

Losing one’s home is a painful experience, but losing it at the hand of someone you love, is much more worse. This was what a family of eight went through, earlier this year.

It all started with a pair of sneakers requested by one of the children, his parents assured him that he would receive a pair on Friday, when his father- a farm worker would receive his wages. Alas, the farmer for whom he worked did not pay his workers that day, but assured his workers that they would be paid the following day. Little did anyone know what horror would come from his inability to pay his workers that day.

The young man asked for money for his sneakers that very evening. His father explained the situation to him, but reassured him that he would receive the money the following day. The young man stormed out livid and did not go home that night. Upon his return, the following day, the young man found the family home empty. He poured paraffin all over and set the house alight. In that single moment, the family lost not only their home, but everything they possessed, even their Identity Documents, school uniforms, everything.

The young man was arrested for arson, which caused further stress for the family. No parent wants their child in jail, especially not at their hand.

Upon hearing about the family’s situation, we acted to solve the immediate problem, shelter. An entire family, more so with such young children in the household, could not be left homeless. The Local Municipality heeded our pleas and provided a ‘disaster shelter’ for the family to use for six months. With the most immediate problem solved, we could now step to the next, clothing.

Operation Blanket, a Mafikeng based NPO and Project: LAYLA, a programme under their administration were informed of the situation and opened their doors to us. Members of our team, along with Operation Blanket staff sorted clothing for the family, making sure to male their parcels as suitable as possible, including uniforms, school shoes, jerseys and so much more. These parcels were handed to the family, who received so much comfort from the kindness shown to them.

Once more, generosity and kindness, brought hope in what seemed to be a hopeless situation.

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“How beautiful a day can be
When kindness touches it”~ George Elliston

The 24th of November 2010, was a day that not only clothed 30 children, but ensured that also proved that kindness does indeed have far reaching consequences, that go beyond what words could ever possibly describe. It was a day of nothing but joy, in the village of Rooigrond.

Project: LAYLA, which aims to get people to donate an item of clothing personalised with a note, has the motto, “…A little kindness goes a long way…”, under the administration of Operation Blanket, a Mafikeng based NGO lived up to it’s motto on this special day.

It was on this day, Project: LAYLA’s 2nd Anniversary that, 30 learners at the Rooigrond Early Learning Centre received ‘kindness parcels’ and had what would turn out to be a very enjoyable day.

The day started off with the kiddies playing party games with Samantha Smith and Waseema Petersen, two youths who kindly gave up their time to make the day extra special for the kiddies. This was followed by lunch, courtesy of MeatSA (Mafikeng) which the kiddies enjoyed tremendously, before cake cutting time, all thanks to the Project: LAYLA Project Co-ordinator- Nadia Petersen.

The highlight of the day, however, was when Tolamoetlile Kgobokoe, handed out ‘kindness parcels’ to all. Each child received a parcel filled with clothes, to ensure that not being clothed was not a hindrance to them receiving an early education. The Rooigrond Early Learning Centre itself, was also a benefactor. With the teacher, Maserame Setlhoko, accepting a goody bag-with things meant to make the kiddies day more pleasant.

The day was blessed indeed, all because of the kindness of others. Project: LAYLA and Operation Blanket ensured that the kindness of others, reached those who need it most, the innocents of this world- children.